©2018 by Sargeant Team. Keller Williams Central Oklahoma

(405) 812-1204

10 E. Campbell Street

Edmond, OK 73034

(405) 330-2626

Keller Williams Central Oklahoma

Countertops: All You Need to Know from an Expert

I often have clients and friends who come to me and ask advice on countertops. Unfortunately, I am not the expert and anything I could possibly tell them is simply my best guess. The good news is I defer to someone who actually is an expert who can help lead not only me, but you in your next countertop decision! Here’s what my friend Jessica Richey, an interior designer at Traditions Fine Furniture and Design has to say.



With the plethora of choices on the market today, choosing the right countertops for your home can be an intimidating task.  Whether you’re choosing a product for a remodel or a new build, countertops are not only one of the biggest investments you will make financially, they also significantly impact the look and feel of your space.  As a professional interior designer, I help my clients in the decision making process from understanding the quality of different countertop materials to finding the look my clients love. I also help them understand the steps toward finding the function they need. Here are a few steps to help you get started!

Step One: Do Your Research!

Here are some of the most popular countertop materials and their properties so you compare your options.

1. Solid Surface

Man made material (Corian is a popular brand name)


  • Wide variety of colors and edge profile

  • Not heat resistant—will scorch and melt

  • Easily scratched and chipped but can be professionally repaired

  • Non-porous surface and resists bacteria

  • Some types are more chemical resistant than others

  • Will stain

  • Less expensive than natural stone or quartz

  • Sold per square foot

2. Granite


  • Natural Stone

  • Wide variety of colors, patterns, surface finishes, and edge profile

  • Heat-proof

  • Very hard —resists scratching, chipping, and etching but can be professionally repaired

  • Requires yearly sealing (homeowner can do this)

  • Resists stains

  • May contain natural elements that some see as “blemishes”

  • Sold either in whole slab or remnant

  • Cost is usually reflected in a range of five levels with level one being the least expensive and levels 5+ being the most expensive.  Level one averages $50 per square foot.


Marble

  • Natural Stone

  • Wide variety of colors, patterns, finishes, and edge profiles

  • Offers some soft patterns and light coloration that granite does not

  • Heat-proof

  • Scratches, etches, and chips easily but can be professionally repaired

  • Requires yearly sealing (homeowner can do this)

  • Stains easily

  • May contain natural elements that some see as “blemishes”

  • Sold either in whole slab or remnant

  • Cost is usually reflected in a range of five levels with level one being the least expensive, and levels 5+ being the most expensive.  Level one averages $60 per square foot.

Quartz

  • Man made with a mixture of crushed natural quartz and an acrylic binder


  • Wide variety of colors, patterns, finishes, and edge profiles

  • Heat resistant up to 600 degrees, but be careful here!

  • Very hard — resists scratching and chipping but can be professionally repaired

  • Does not require sealing

  • Resists stains

  • Will yellow or fade in direct sun

  • Perfectly uniform in color and texture

  • Sold either in whole slab or remnant

  • Cost averages $65 per square foot

Quartzite

  • Natural Stone

  • Wide variety of colors, patterns, finishes, and edge profiles

  • Tends to offer the softer patterns and light colorations similar to marble, but is much more durable.

  • Heat-proof

  • Extremely hard — difficult to scratch or chip, but can be professionally repaired

  • Requires yearly sealing (homeowner can do this)

  • Resists stains

  • May contain natural elements that some see as “blemishes”

  • Sold either in whole slab or remnant

  • Cost averages $80 plus per square foot.

  • Word of warning:  Some stone yards are mis-labeling marble as quartzite, and users have been dismayed to find their countertops scratching and chipping easily when they expected something much more durable!  Be sure and ask for a sample piece to test in order to make sure the product is truly quartzite not marble.


Step Two:  Find a fabricator

The fabricator is the one that usually sells you your material and fabricates (cuts) and installs your countertops.  I asked my friend Shara Castillo of Castlerock Countertops in Edmond, Oklahoma what a customer should look for when choosing a fabricator.  

She said that great customer service is extremely important in order for the customer to feel confident throughout the process. In her business, she prides herself in being very hands-on so that there are not any surprises, and she has kept the company small in order to better serve her customers. Once you’ve chosen a stone, Shara said to be sure and ask the fabricator to give you a piece of the slab to take home and test.  Cut on it, drop stuff on it, try and stain it etc. so that you will see first-hand how it performs before making a final decision.

After a stone or product is chosen, your fabricator will work with you to select a finish (such as polished, honed, or leathered) and an edge profile that you like.

The fabricator will send a professional out to your home or office in order to make templates for the tops.  If it’s a new construction, the cabinets need to be set, and specification sheets for the appliances and plumbing fixtures need to be provided if possible.

Next Steps:

When thinking about buying or selling a home, you probably have a list of questions a mile long not just about countertops, but about the process, expectations, and other features of the house. Know that I’m always happy to answer questions or point you to someone who can answer them better than I can (like my friend Jessica when it comes to countertops).  Or, if you’re in the market to buy or sell a home, I’d love to talk to you. You can reach me at (405) 812-1204 or lauren@sargeantteam.net.

About Jessica:

Jessica Richey, Interior Designer at Traditions Fine Furniture and Design


3409 S. Broadway Suite 100

Edmond, OK 73013

405-608-8899

Jessica@traditionsedmond.com

Jessica earned a Bachelor of Science in Interior Design at Oklahoma State University, and has worked at Traditions for about 7 years.

“ I specialize in creating timeless residential and commercial interior spaces that meet the needs of each individual client, both functionally and aesthetically. I believe that a person’s space tells a story of who they are, and I love to come alongside each client to assist in making their dreams a reality.”